Two blogs that prove there are no blogging rules

Marketing legend Seth Godin

Anyone who says there’s a rule book for good blogging is just plain wrong.

Two nuggets of pure gold from two pioneers of social media this week showed how utterly old-fashioned that idea is.

Both shared big and inspiring thoughts with their readers, yet there was a gaping chasm in their formats.

Step forward Seth Godin and Chris Brogan, whose postings this week – when juxtaposed side-by-side – show that even the most basic assumptions about blogging cannot be assumed. Continue reading

Why we no longer need paper

What have Seth Godin, Laura Lippman, the Huffington Post and the Oxford English Dictionary got in common?

They say it’s not a crime to make a mistake.

Clearly that’s not always the case and so I prefer the faithful bed fellow of that phrase: “The real crime is the failure to learn from ones mistakes”.

Thus it was with an approving nod that I read at the weekend that the venerable Oxford Online Dictionary had announced its next edition might only be available online.

The current (and second) edition of the dictionary – 20 hefty volumes costing £750 ($1,165) – has been sold around 30,000 times since publication in 1989, mostly to obsessive bibliophiles and weird collectors.

The next edition will likely be read by a great many more people and will not be made of dead trees. In fact, the current digital version is already enjoying two million visits a month. Continue reading