Using Twitter ‘favourites’ as a testimonials page

 

 

Michael Taggart in the bath this morning

A Eureka moment came to me this morning as I was fiddling around with my Twitter ‘favourites’ in perplexed bafflement – wondering why on Earth anyone would ever want to ‘favourite’ any tweets.

“Of course! Businesses can use Twitter favourites as a testimonials page,” I exclaimed, simultaneously applauding and reaching round to pat myself on the back.

Except, a few minutes into marveling at the simplistic beauty of my discovery, Google told me that businesses were already doing it the world over. That pesky Google!

Ah well, there goes the Nobel Prize for Social Media. But it’s clearly an idea people like so I’ll share it anyway:

What I’m saying is that businesses and brands should look through their mentions on Twitter and ‘favourite’ the ones that speak highly of them, recommend them or praise them. Why? Because you can link to your ‘favourites’ page from, say, your website and replace your old-style testimonials page with the new Twitter link, calling it “What They Say” or “Testimonials” or something similar. Continue reading

The public sector needs more 'Heads of Digital'

Truly ‘social’ businesses understand that social media offers more than just some new channels through which to shove out top-down, one-way marketing and PR.

Instead of using Twitter, Facebook, YouTube  and the rest to shout about their products, many are providing tailored advice and support and building long-term relationships using the technologies.

They are engaging before, during and after the sale.

In fact, the cleverest companies have gone further still and have embedded digital across their organisations to conduct research and gather intelligence, to connect customers who might be able to help each other, to look for new employees, generate growth ideas and much more.

They are a beacon for the public sector.

Yet, the public sector – excepting some notable and laudable parts – has not yet caught on. Continue reading

A free social media strategy for your business

Building a social media programme is easier than it sounds

I was talking casually to a business owner the other day about what he could get out of social media.

It occurred to me afterwards that the advice I gave him is relevant to you too whether you are small, medium or humungous; whether you sell shark tanks, speech therapy or bleach.

So here’s the beginnings of a plan for your business – base your programme or strategy on this and contact me on Twitter or in the comments if I can be of further help. If this is useful, all I ask in return is that you ‘retweet’ the post or share it in your preferred way. Continue reading

The Long Tail of Politics: social media and the Tea Party movement

 

 

Will the Tea Party mean the end of the party in Washington?

 

 

America has swerved rightwards.

Energised by the Tea Party movement (note: this has nothing to do with buying tea!), the Republicans this week enacted a spectacular revenge on the governing Democrats in the mid-term elections, overturning at least 60 seats in Congress.

Many will explain this away by citing disaffection with the ‘slow progress’ of President Barack Obama’s reforms.

But something less obvious was also at play.

Before we go any further, let me be clear: I am not seeking to express any political view or affiliation here. This is a media blog – and I want to explore the story of how American conservatives have seemingly stolen a digital march on the supposedly tech-savvy Democrats to organise, spread ideas and win hearts and minds. Continue reading

Why we no longer need paper

What have Seth Godin, Laura Lippman, the Huffington Post and the Oxford English Dictionary got in common?

They say it’s not a crime to make a mistake.

Clearly that’s not always the case and so I prefer the faithful bed fellow of that phrase: “The real crime is the failure to learn from ones mistakes”.

Thus it was with an approving nod that I read at the weekend that the venerable Oxford Online Dictionary had announced its next edition might only be available online.

The current (and second) edition of the dictionary – 20 hefty volumes costing £750 ($1,165) – has been sold around 30,000 times since publication in 1989, mostly to obsessive bibliophiles and weird collectors.

The next edition will likely be read by a great many more people and will not be made of dead trees. In fact, the current digital version is already enjoying two million visits a month. Continue reading